Jordan Wegele | Collegian
 Tyler Nenaber, senior in nutrition and kinesiology, taps along with his fellow dancers during WinterDance 2012, put on by the K-State School of Music, Theatre, and Dance. The student showcase runs from Thursday evening to Saturday evening in Nichols Theatre.

K-Staters get down at WinterDance

K-State’s School of Music, Theatre and Dance performed WinterDance 2012 in Nichols Theatre last night. Various dance styles were performed
including ballet, pointe, tap, jazz, lyrical, contemporary, modern and African.

The show’s opening number was
an African piece, and it closed with an upbeat tap routine performed
by K-State’s Tap Dance Ensemble.

However, the audience really got
into the funky, jazz piece titled “Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm,” choreographed by Julie L.
Pentz, associate professor of dance and the show’s director. During the performance, audience members smiled and bobbed their heads to the beat of the music, feeding off of the dancers’ energy.

Elizabeth Zabel, senior in
elementary education, said this was her favorite piece of the show.

“I loved their costumes, and I
really liked the lighting,” Zabel said. “I really liked how the lights
reflected off of the costumes; I thought it really added to it.”

Zabel said that she appreciated the way in which the dancers performed solo before coming together to dance as a group.

Another piece that received an enthusiastic reaction from the audience was “The Hat That… (Part 1).”

The theme was a silly, clumsy guy
dressed in tacky clothes approaching a hat and dancing with it in numerous
ways. Performed by Kyle Myers, graduate student in counseling and student development, it was the only humorous piece in the show and had the audience laughing
hysterically.

Pentz explained how
the dancers prepared for show time.

“The dancers came back early from
fall break, so they were back by Sunday,” Pentz said. “We went into technical
rehearsals and that’s when our lighting designers come into the theatre with
the dancers to work out lights.”

The dancers
had almost a full week’s preparation prior to the show, she said.

“On Tuesday we started our
run-throughs, Pentz said. “So the dancers were in the theatre Sunday, Monday,
Tuesday we started dress rehearsals, Wednesday final dress rehearsal, and here we
are.” 

Pentz added that she thought
the group’s performance was fantastic. She said it was the best yet out of all of the run throughs.

Mary Anderson, Manhattan resident, expressed her enjoyment for the very last piece of the show.

“I think it was a great idea to
close out the show with that tap dance,” Anderson said. “It was so upbeat, it
made me want to get up and tap dance with them.”

The final two showings of Winter Dance 2012 will be tonight and tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. in Nichols Theatre with an additional matinee showing at 2:30 p.m. tomorrow. K-State’s School of Music, Theatre, and Dance will also put on a SpringDance showcase with
the same variety of dance styles as the WinterDance. SpringDance 2013 is scheduled for April 5 and 6 of next year in McCain Auditorium. 

While working on a computer, Cameron Marshall, 3rd year architecture student, listens to Brandon Lambrecht, 3rd year architecture student, talk about a fireplace on their model Wednesday night in Seaton Hall.

Architecture program continues to receive high rankings, honors

The College of Architecture, Planning and Design at K-State continued its record of high rankings in the November/December 2012 issue of Design Intelligence magazine entitled “America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools 2013.” 

In the newest edition of the magazine, K-State placed 13th in the architecture graduate program, 11th in the landscape architecture graduate program and 9th in the interior design graduate program. 

Ann Huynh, sophomore in architecture, said being an architecture student means late nights and several long, detailed projects.  However, she added that the professors make sure students are constantly learning more every day. 

“They push us to the limit so that you can do the best you can,” Huynh said. “It’s nice because some of the teachers have different focuses and different expectations, so you have freedom to see what you are best at and what the best technique is for yourself.” 

This is the fifth time in the last five years the graduate program in architecture has been ranked in the top 20, and the fourth time it has been ranked in the top 15. 

The 2013 edition, unlike the 2012 edition, took into account undergraduate programs, and, according to an email interview with Tim de Noble, professor and dean of the College of Architecture, Planning and Design, K-State no longer has an undergraduate architecture program. 

The undergraduate programs for landscape architecture and interior design, according to de Noble, both placed in the top 10 for 2013. 

In 2012, K-State placed fifth in graduate programs for architecture, following only Harvard, Yale, Columbia and Washington University. Below K-State in this category are schools such as Cornell and MIT. 

K-State’s undergraduate programs in interior architecture design and landscape design were ranked in the top eight in the design magazine. 

When comparing the rankings of other colleges in the Skills Assessment Section of the magazine in 2012, K-State ranked in the top five in seven of eight categories. No other public or private university was in the top five in more than five categories on the list, according to de Noble. 

The programs offered by the college aim to give students the chance to get ready for the world of employment. 

“The college has provided us with opportunities to meet future employers, such as the Design Expo, and they help us prepare by providing mock interviews and portfolio classes throughout the year,” said Logan Carlyle, junior in architecture. 

Carlyle said that due to the college’s low teacher-to-student ratio, each student is personally taught, motivating students to work harder.

The Design Intelligence Special Report on Architecture School Tuition and Fees 2012-2013 said K-State is the 15th least expensive program in the nation when considering in-state tuition and the 14th least expensive program when considering out-of-state tuition. 

K-State also has the least expensive architecture program ranked in the magazine.

De Noble said he hopes for the college to remain as successful as it has been so far and to continue to improve its programs as time goes on. 

“We will continue to focus on the role of design and planning professionals as leaders in our society,” de Noble said. 

De Noble added that the rankings reflect the willingness and drive of the students, as well as the dedication and supportive nature the faculty and staff have demonstrated over the years.

Hannah Hunsinger | Collegian
A collection of petitions sit at the ready to be signed by students that attended the speech forum organized by Travis Smith and his Speech II class on Thursday afternoon in the Leadership Studies Building.  Six K-State students presented persuasive speeches on issues ranging from concealed carry laws to beer at K-State athletic events and urged students to show their support by signing petitions.

Speech students present petitions for on-campus issues

On Thursday afternoon, six K-State students presented persuasive speeches to an audience in an attempt to convince students to sign petitions and spread the word on the proposals presented.

The event, put on in part by Speech II instructor Travis Smith, and held in the Town Hall Room of the Leadership Studies Building, allowed presenters to argue for changes in school policy while answering audience members’ questions.

Ryan Ackerman, senior in finance, gave a speech promoting concealed carry permits for firearms on campus. His ideas hit home with Kimberly Allen, senior in marketing.

“I liked his style of speaking,” Allen said. “I think he brought up an issue that universities don’t really like to touch upon. I don’t have a license and wouldn’t be comfortable carrying a weapon, but it would be nice if somebody like Ryan, who’s a responsible guy, to have our backs in a bad situation.”

Ackerman told the crowd that there were 75 murders on college campuses last year alone, as well as a staggering 80,000 cases of forcible sexual assault.

Yet, Ackerman said, the only non-police on campus who are carrying firearms are those perpetrating violent acts.

“K-State is a very safe campus,” Ackerman told the crowd. “But so was Virginia Tech before 2007.”

The sale of beer at university athletic events was the subject of Blair DeBord’s proposal. DeBord, senior in marketing and a baseball player himself, argued for the increases in revenue and improved overall fan experience that the selling of cereal malt beverages at K-State athletics events would provide.

“It’s not an issue of legality,” DeBord said. “According to Casey Scott, senior associate athletics director for operations and event management, it’s an issue of morality and how K-State wants to be seen as an institution.”

DeBord noted the revenue and attendance increases at the University of Nebraska, and Wichita State University since adding alcohol to the in-game menu. He also cited West Virginia’s $700,000 in additional revenue from alcohol sales at football games, and predicted a revenue increase of $57,000 from alcohol sales at K-State baseball games alone.

K-State’s growing multicultural population and lack of adequate spatial representation for the 34 multicultural organizations on campus were the focus of the speech given by Mercedes Perry, junior in human resources and American ethnic studies.  

Perry showed slides of multicultural centers at the University of Kansas, the University of Nebraska and the University of Missouri before revealing the multicultural office located in the K-State Student Union.  

“Does this look like K-State is keeping up?” Perry asked as the crowd chuckled.

Perry’s solution was for students to sign her petition to utilize Holtz Hall, which currently houses the Career and Employment Services offices that will be moving into the new East Stadium Welcome Center upon its opening, leaving a spot for multicultural organizations to call home.

“There are no current plans for Holtz Hall,” Perry said. “But that can change if we just support this move.”

Azsha Thompson didn’t ask for much, just that left-handed students be given adequate access to left-handed desks and tables in K-State classrooms. It was enough to get John Petterson, junior in communication studies, on board.

“It’s something that I don’t really think about too often,” said Petterson, who is right-handed. “But every once in a while I get stuck with a left-handed desk and it really bugs me. I can see where she is coming from.”

A boisterous Thompson brought much of the crowd to laughter several times throughout her speech, urging them to sign a petition that would have K-State record accurate numbers and provide quality seating for lefties in all classrooms.

Jim Woods, senior in communication studies, proposed on-campus busing for the benefit of students.

“We already have off-campus bus routes, and K-State students are the No. 1 users of ATA buses in Manhattan,” Woods said. “Why shouldn’t we have on-campus bus routes as well?”

Woods proposed a three-stop bus route that would alleviate the problems getting from one spot on campus to another and freeing up more time for seconds-starved K-State students to get things done.

He said that money is not the issue prohibiting an on-campus bus route, noting that lack of planning currently prevents students from getting a ride across campus.

The other proposition presented may have hit close to home with students in the audience as Jess Wood, senior in marketing, used a personal experience to raise awareness about the potential pitfalls associated with young and first-time renters getting scammed out of money by rental companies.

“Young renters don’t understand the importance of filling out a proper condition form before renting,” Wood said. “We’re getting swindled.”

Wood laid out his experience on a slide detailing how he and his roommates saved over $2,000 in potential losses to a property-management company. They had to get a lawyer to clear themselves of the bogus charges, but Wood urged that awareness would rid future renters of the same troubles.

His petition aimed to provide incoming students with information on how to avoid a bad situation with a future landlord. 

Students that attended were invited to ask questions and sign the petitions after the speeches were completed.

Hannah Hunsinger | Collegian
Audience members listen to Christina Rock’s presentation “Does HIV Look Like Me?” in the K-State Student Union’s Little Theatre Thursday night.

Speaker presents firsthand account of living with HIV

The K-State
Student Union Little Theatre housed a group Thursday night
for an emotionally-charged, firsthand account of the challenges of living with
HIV. The goal of the presentation was to raise awareness of HIV and AIDS.

The Union
Program Council-sponsored event “Does HIV Look Like Me?” brought the story of
Christina Rock to Manhattan.

Rock, who
works with the organization Hope’s Voice, tested positive for HIV before she
was 3 years old during a time when testing positive for HIV meant a greater
chance of death than it does today.

The source
of Rock’s infection was her mother, most likely through breast milk, Rock said.

“You might
as well start planning your funeral,” Rock said, concerning what it was like to be
diagnosed in the 1980s.

Rock said
the doctors told her father she probably wouldn’t live past the age of 10
because of the lack of treatment options.

When new
medicine came about in 1996, Rock, then 12 years old, said she was severely sick and “ready to die.”

The new
medicine saved her life. Eventually Rock began speaking publicly about her story, hoping her openness would spread awareness throughout
the upcoming generation. 

“This
generation can be the generation that can end AIDS,” Rock said. “You do that by
talking. Talking about your status. Going with friends and getting tested to
find out their status. Just talking and sharing information. And
erasing the stigma that surrounds it.”

Rock, who
has stabilized her condition to a very low HIV virus count, now has two healthy
children and a husband who are not infected with the HIV virus.

For Tyler
Jameson, sophomore in secondary education, Rock’s story hit a personal note.

Jameson
said he has a close friend who is HIV-positive and that it was comforting to hear
another perspective from someone who has lived through a similar situation.

“It was
really beneficial because, though me and my friend have talked about it, it’s
like one of those things that we don’t really talk about,” Jameson said. “But
it was really nurturing to realize that it’s not just him. He’s not alone.”

Rock broke
her presentation into three parts: HIV and AIDS 101, her personal
story and a question and answer session.

Pointing
out common misconceptions about HIV is one area Rock focused on. The first common
confusion Rock noted was that just because a person is infected with HIV doesn’t mean they have AIDS.

“A lot of
people get those two words confused and think they are the exact same thing,”
Rock said. “HIV is a virus. AIDS is a clinical diagnosis.”

Rock also
clarified a few of the ways HIV can be contracted, including unprotected sex,
unsanitary needles for drug use and even breast milk.

“The breast
is not always the best,” Rock said, getting a laugh out of the audience, which
she did often throughout her presentation.

Courtney
Kolterman, senior in public health nutrition, said Rock’s personal story concerning how she became infected with HIV was probably the most beneficial
aspect of her presentation.

“I think
that in a way she’s kind of educating others on the different ways to transmit
it. It’s not just through having sex. It can be through breast milk like she
said,” Kolterman said. “I think it’s just raising awareness that there are
those misconceptions and we need to clarify those.”

Jacob Dean Wilson | Collegian
Members of the K-State volleyball team celebrate after scoring a point in the third and final set against the Northern Iowa Panthers on Thursday. The Wildcats came from behind and narrowly missed extending the match into a fourth set during the first round of the NCAA Women’s Volleyball Championship in Lincoln, Neb. The team lost the set 21-25.

Volleyball team falls in first round of NCAA tournament

A once-promising season came to an end Thursday night, as the K-State volleyball team fell to the Northern Iowa Panthers in three sets in the first round of the NCAA tournament in Lincoln, Neb. The Panthers’ defense stifled the Wildcats’ offense, never allowing them to gain any ground. K-State finished the match with a hitting percentage of .164.

The Panthers got off to quick start in both of the first two sets, going up 5-1 and 6-2 and taking a commanding two to zero set lead into intermission.

The Wildcats showed some signs of life early in the third set as they jumped out to a quick 3-point lead and appeared to be ready to get back into the match. Unfortunately, the Panthers fought back to take a 13-9 lead, forcing a K-State timeout. The Wildcats got back into the match, cutting the deficit to 22-20, but that was as close as they came before the Panthers went on to close out the match.

K-State was led by junior middle blocker Kaitlynn Pelger, who finished the match with seven kills but, like the rest of the team, just could not get into any kind of rhythm on the offensive end.

K-State finishes the season with a 21-9 record. The careers of setter Caitlyn Donahue, opposite Kathleen Ludwig, defensive specialist Ali Boehler, middle blocker Alex Muff and defensive specialist Kuulei Kabalis came to an end, after the seniors helped guide the Wildcats to back-to-back NCAA tournament berths.

While working on a computer, Cameron Marshall, 3rd year architecture student, listens to Brandon Lambrecht, 3rd year architecture student, talk about a fireplace on their model Wednesday night in Seaton Hall.

Architecture program continues to receive high rankings, honors

The College of Architecture, Planning and Design at K-State continued its record of high rankings in the November/December 2012 issue of Design Intelligence magazine entitled “America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools 2013.” 

In the newest edition of the magazine, K-State placed 13th in the architecture graduate program, 11th in the landscape architecture graduate program and 9th in the interior design graduate program. 

Ann Huynh, sophomore in architecture, said being an architecture student means late nights and several long, detailed projects.  However, she added that the professors make sure students are constantly learning more every day. 

“They push us to the limit so that you can do the best you can,” Huynh said. “It’s nice because some of the teachers have different focuses and different expectations, so you have freedom to see what you are best at and what the best technique is for yourself.” 

This is the fifth time in the last five years the graduate program in architecture has been ranked in the top 20, and the fourth time it has been ranked in the top 15. 

The 2013 edition, unlike the 2012 edition, took into account undergraduate programs, and, according to an email interview with Tim de Noble, professor and dean of the College of Architecture, Planning and Design, K-State no longer has an undergraduate architecture program. 

The undergraduate programs for landscape architecture and interior design, according to de Noble, both placed in the top 10 for 2013. 

In 2012, K-State placed fifth in graduate programs for architecture, following only Harvard, Yale, Columbia and Washington University. Below K-State in this category are schools such as Cornell and MIT. 

K-State’s undergraduate programs in interior architecture design and landscape design were ranked in the top eight in the design magazine. 

When comparing the rankings of other colleges in the Skills Assessment Section of the magazine in 2012, K-State ranked in the top five in seven of eight categories. No other public or private university was in the top five in more than five categories on the list, according to de Noble. 

The programs offered by the college aim to give students the chance to get ready for the world of employment. 

“The college has provided us with opportunities to meet future employers, such as the Design Expo, and they help us prepare by providing mock interviews and portfolio classes throughout the year,” said Logan Carlyle, junior in architecture. 

Carlyle said that due to the college’s low teacher-to-student ratio, each student is personally taught, motivating students to work harder.

The Design Intelligence Special Report on Architecture School Tuition and Fees 2012-2013 said K-State is the 15th least expensive program in the nation when considering in-state tuition and the 14th least expensive program when considering out-of-state tuition. 

K-State also has the least expensive architecture program ranked in the magazine.

De Noble said he hopes for the college to remain as successful as it has been so far and to continue to improve its programs as time goes on. 

“We will continue to focus on the role of design and planning professionals as leaders in our society,” de Noble said. 

De Noble added that the rankings reflect the willingness and drive of the students, as well as the dedication and supportive nature the faculty and staff have demonstrated over the years.