Porn safer than food? Professor says “yes”

0
84

According to a blog post by Doug Powell, professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology at K-State, the porn industry is more responsible than the food industry when it comes to safety and health standards.

On Barfblog, Powell shed light on how companies producing, handling and manufacturing food products are being scandalously irresponsible by blaming consumers for not cooking or washing tainted food products without providing sufficient instructions on how to do so.

“I would argue the porn industry is more responsible than the food industry, because the food industry says: ‘you have got to cook your pot pies’ or ‘you have to cook your hamburger,” said Powell in a blog post entitled Food Safety Culture: Alberta Style. “That would be like the porn industry saying ‘just use a condom.’”

Powell is referring to the controversial situation in which California’s multibillion-dollar porn industry came to a screeching stop in production after an unidentified male actor tested positive for the HIV virus. This is definitely not an isolated case, since many similar instances have occurred in the past, all of which resulted in similar precautions taken by the porn industry to reduce the spreading of the infection. According to an August 2011 ABC News by Katie Moisse, the industry was shut down for a month in 2004 after actor Darren James passed the virus to three women.

Powell analyzed data from several outbreaks of rampant pathogens that include the 1985 E.coli O157:H7 scare in London, Ontario, the Salmonella Banquet pot pies in 2007 resulting in 401 illnesses in 41 states with 32 percent hospitalization, and an outbreak of Listeria in cantaloupes in Colorado in 2011 in which 33 people died. He notes that some food manufacturing plants have been sloppy at best in regards to proper food preparation procedures. For example, he notes that ConAgra said turkey pot pies were safe if consumers followed cooking directions. However, these directions were poor and haphazardly written; microwave instructions said to cook for four minutes.

“Microwave heating of this type of product would no doubt be variable,” said Randall Phebus, professor of animal science and industry. “Particularly when you look at all the different types of microwave ovens out there.”

In this particular instance the evidence points towards the irresponsibility of the manufacturers, because after cooking for the specified time the product was partially raw. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, poultry must be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 165 degrees in order to be safe for consumption, and cooking a product halfway increases the odds of pathogens surviving.

Luckily for K-Staters, two prominent figures in Housing and Dining Services ensure that the department adheres to strict food safety regulations that guarantee students’ well-being above all. Mary Molt, assistant director of Housing and Dining Services and recipient of a 2012 Silver Plate Award from the International Foodservice Manufacturers Association, said that students are in good hands every time they visit the dining halls.

“I can say that we do a fantastic job in food safety, and we are far beyond the industry standard,” Molt said. “We even provide a food safety training for our staff.”

Michelle Netson, project director for hospitality management and dietetics and certified ServSafe food safety instructor, agreed. She said that the staff doesn’t rest until all food safety procedures are carried out with meticulous precision to eliminate the possibility of anything going wrong.

“We take food safety extremely serious,” Netson said. “We do training with the staff on the hazard analysis and critical control point plan, where we analyze and prevent any possibility of anything going wrong from the moment food arrives to the point where the students consume it. We also have many people who are ServSafe certified by the National Restaurant Association. That is why we are here, to ensure kids have the best experience possible.”

Advertisement
SHARE