A primer on campus sculptures

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'Ad Astra E Terra' is located on the northwest side of Seaton Hall and was originally meant to serve as a teaching ad when donated in 1988. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

‘The Fork’

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Commonly called 'the fork', the scuptured 'untitled' by James Wentz in 1969 turns to shadow against the evening sky on August 9, 2016. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

Created by James Wentz in 1969 during the “Art-In-Situation” workshop in 1969, this untitled sculpture is the tallest on campus at 20 feet tall. The sculpture is made of wood, fiberglass and plastic and can be found between King Hall and the Leadership Studies Building. While most students call the statue a fork or spork (and some a Wildcat paw), others argue that it resembles a king chess piece, which may make sense considering its location, right outside King Hall.

‘Trapezoid’

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Students study on the benches connected to the clock tower in the Cauffman Commons area of campus on January 26, 2015. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

Nick Zack created this untitled sculpture as part of the “Art-in-Situation” workshop in 1969. Located in the Coffman Commons, the sculpture was meant to bring color to the campus thanks to the stainless steel disk. The sculpture is meant to resemble a pregnant woman lying down. Students can fit inside the sculpture but only in the fetal position, to resemble a child in the womb.

“The disc will provide a smooth mirrored surface which will reflect the morning and afternoon sun,” Zack said in an interview in the July 23, 1969, edition of The Kansas State Collegian. “Various colors will also be reflected from the disc.”

‘The Twister’

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Twisted metal makes up the scupture ‘untitled’ east of Bushnell Hall on August 3, 2016. The sculpture memorializes the tornado that hit campus in 2008. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

Constructed in 2012, this untitled sculpture memorializes the 2008 tornado that hit the K-State campus, damaging buildings and destroying more than 200 trees that were planted between 1890-1900. Located east of Bushnell Hall, the sculpture was designed by horticulture students as part of a class project.

Hard Work

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The piece titled 'Hard Work' rests upon Umberger Hall on August 9, 2016. The piece was part of the "Art-In-Situation" workshop held through the 1960s and 1970s. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

Created by Barry West as part of the “Art-In-Situation” workshop, this aluminum sculpture can be found over the main entrance to Umberger Hall.

Ad Astra E. Terra

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'Ad Astra E Terra' is located on the northwest side of Seaton Hall and was originally meant to serve as a teaching ad when donated in 1988. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

Latin for “from the earth to the stars,” the Havens Steel Company donated this sculpture located on the northwest side of Seaton Hall in 1988. The sculpture, meant to serve as a visual teaching aid, consists of 25 steel members and more than 144 bolts hold it in place.

A Kind Touch

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"A Kind Touch," located between Trotter and Mosier Halls, was created by David L. Spellerberg in May 1999. It stands in memory of Dr. Bob Kind and was donated by his wife Mary Lee Kind. (File Photo by Parker Robb | The Collegian)

Dedicated to K-State College of Veterinary Medicine alum Dr. Bob Kind, this sculpture of Kind with a boy and his dog, is located between Mosier and Trotter Halls. Sculptor David L. Spellerberg created the piece and it was donated by Kind’s wife Mary Lee Kind in 1999.

“A Kind Touch” located between Trotter and Mosier Halls, was created by David L. Spellerberg in May 1999. It stands in memory of Dr. Bob Kind and was donated by his wife Mary Lee Kind.

Spiral Jade

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'Spiral Jade' juts out of the ground in the shadow of Kedzie Hall on August 9, 2016. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

This sculpture, found just east of Kedzie Hall, was purchased by the university in 1976. Reverend Leland Lubbers created the piece by hammering a train axle and using a train wheel as the base. A similar piece by the artist can be found at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

William Alexander Harris Bust

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The bust of William Alexander Harris shines off the morning sun on August 10, 2016. Harris was a former U.S. Senator from Kansas who served as an adjetant general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

This bust of the former U.S. Senator from Kansas is unique in that it memorializes a man who served as an adjutant general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War before moving to Kansas. The piece, found at the entrance to the north side of Fairchild Hall, was sculpted by Carlo Romanelli. University records are inconclusive of when it was created.

Kreqe-aekyed and Kqrefe-aekyad

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The black scuptures entitled 'Kreqe-aekyed and Kqrefe-aekyad' remain standing on August 9, 2016 in front of Thompson Hall. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

The twin stainless steel sculptures, located west of Thompson Hall, were created by Douglas Abdell in 1980. The first sculpture was partially paid for by The Price R. and Flora A. Reid Foundation and the second sculpture was later donated to the university by the foundation.

‘Beach Chandelier’

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The scupture 'Chandelier' by Dale Chihuly radiates its orange glow through the windows of the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art on August 9, 2016. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

Hanging prominently in the lobby of the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art, this twisted original glass sculpture was acquired by the university in 1996. Created by Washington state native Dale Chihuly, the piece weighs 300 pounds, measures 12 feet in length and greets all visitors of the museum.

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