For the fifth consecutive year, K-State fall semester enrollment declines

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Anderson Hall and the grand lawn opens up to the rest of campus as the sun sets on Aug. 9, 2016. (Evert Nelson | The Collegian)

Kansas State enrollment has declined for the fifth consecutive year, according to census numbers released by the Kansas Board of Regents. Fall enrollment at all K-State campuses is 22,221, down 574 students from fall 2017.

Based on those same numbers, about 30 percent of the enrollment decline is a direct result of decreased international enrollment rates.

Pat Bosco, vice president for the Office of Student Life and dean of students, said despite lowered enrollment, the university did see record enrollment in the current semester in hispanic students.

That being said, the overall “students of color” in enrollment decreased for the second consecutive year. The number of black students at K-State also fell for the sixth year in a row, down more than 30 percent from 2012.

In his State of the University address Friday, President Richard Myers discussed the university’s overall new goal of prioritizing out-of-state enrollment. Such goals are emphasized by the introduction of non-Kansas resident scholarships like the Inspiration Award and the Recognition Award starting in the fall of 2019.

The freshman to sophomore retention rate is the highest in university history, Bosco said, which he attributes to Emily Lehning, associate vice president for student life and director of new student services. Additionally, the size of the freshman class at K-State increased three percent.

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Kaylie Mclaughlin
My name is Kaylie McLaughlin and I'm one of the Co-Editors-in-Chief. I grew up just outside of Kansas City in Shawnee, KS. I’m a sophomore in digital journalism with a minor in French and a secondary focus in international and area studies. In the past, I’ve focused primarily on multimedia journalism, but I’ve always been passionate about storytelling. I am fueled by a lot of coffee and I spend my (sparse) free time watching stand-up comedy and reading news magazines.