Men’s golf places last at Big 12 Match Play Championship

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Will Hopkins places the ball during the first round of the Big 12 Golf Championship at Prairie Dunes Country Club on April 26, 2021. (Archive photo by Sophie Osborn | Collegian Media Group)

Kansas State men’s golf fell to five Big 12 teams at Houston Oaks Golf Club in Hockley, Texas, at the Big 12 Match Play Championship. Matches against Kansas in the pool and Baylor in the championship round concluded K-State’s Wednesday.

“I’m proud of our guys for how hard they played today,” K-State head coach Grant Robbins said to K-State Athletics on Wednesday. “It wasn’t the result we wanted, but we have to take the positives and learn from it and get better.”

The Kansas Jayhawks found a Wednesday morning victory with a 2-1-3 finish ahead of the Wildcats in the Pool A standings. The loss set K-State in a matchup against the Baylor Bears, where the Bears defeated the Wildcats 4-2-0.

The loss put K-State in 10th place — last in the Big 12.

“If you look back at the week, we had the chance to win three matches going into the last hole and weren’t able to get it done,” Robbins said. “It was a combination of the other teams hitting clutch shots and us not executing like we need to under pressure.

Senior Will Hopkins claimed his third win of the event against Baylor 3&1, earning a draw against Kansas as well.

Redshirt freshman Cooper Schultz picked up a 4&2 win against Kansas on Wednesday, adding to his win and draw from Tuesday. However, he would lose a close one against Baylor.

Ethan Miller and Nicklaus Mason both fell 5&3 against the Jayhawks. Miller narrowly lost in the championship round, but Mason won a 1-Up victory against the Bears.

Tim Tillmanns and Luke O’Neill had draws against KU, but both lost to Baylor in the championship round match. Tillmanns lost 6&5 to Baylor, while O’Neill lost 5&4.

The Texas Longhorns claimed the championship with a 3-2-1 win over the Texas Tech Red Raiders, one of the five teams K-State fell to.

“This was a great tournament for us because, as coaches, we learned a lot about our team; what our strengths are and where we are weak,” Robbins said to K-State athletics. “We have to work hard and improve in all areas. We will definitely be a better team after this.”

K-State plays its final fall tournament October 30-31 at the Steelewood Collegiate in Loxley, Alabama.

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